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Never Knew I Was LIke Einstein

People tend to repeat themselves.  Perhaps it is because that is what we experienced from our childhood.  Parents, teachers, pastors, group leaders, and coaches would tell us “something”, then add “now don’t forget”, then greet us upon our next time together with, “Did you remember to….?”  Why?  They knew that for most of us we hear lots of things.  Unless someone takes the time to repeat what they intend for us to know, in all likelihood, we will not remember what the person said.  Perhaps the problem is lack of concentration.  It might be that we have something else running through our brain when the person told us what it was we were to do.  Or, it may be that we had “too many” folks giving us “to do’s” in a short period of time and one or more of them slipped our memory.

As we age, the ability to remember diminishes.  So, we find ourselves making lists, or asking our spouse to remind us, or immediately upon being “asked”, we request that our helpers in a business setting make sure that we remember to do an important task.  There are minor irritations that come with forgetting where we put our glasses or our car keys.  It is much more serious when we forget to take critical medicines on time.  Memory is a gift and discipline is required to sharpen one’s memory so that more is retained than lost.

There are those few folks among us that are highly intelligent.  They think on such deeper or loftier concepts that temporal issues are not retained.  Some of the most brilliant people could provide solutions to some of man’s most perplexing problems.  But, left alone, they could not remember the simplest of facts.

There are times when we humans can be very forgetful.  So what is your worst forgetful moment?  One day after Albert Einstein had moved to his home at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, New Jersey, the telephone rang in the office of the Dean of the Princeton Graduate School.  The voice on the other end inquired, “May I speak with Dr. Einstein, please?” 

The secretary stated that Dr. Einstein was not “in”. The caller then continued, “Can you tell me where Dr. Einstein lives?” 

The secretary politely stated that she could not do that since Dr. Einstein wished to have his privacy respected. 

The voice on the telephone then dropped to a whisper, “Please don’t tell anyone, but I am Dr. Einstein.  I am on my way home, and have forgotten where my house is.”  (Copied).

This illustration makes me beam.  Whenever I read of a man like Einstein that could not remember his new address or where his home was located, I feel grand.  My mother always wanted me to be like the mental giants in my classes at school.  She dreamed of rearing a Rhodes Scholar, a Pulitzer Prize winner, or a “PhD in some challenging field.  I can now tell her that I have a lot in common with Einstein. Many times, I can’t remember my address either!  GPS take me home, please!!!