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In Seasons of Distress and Grief

My heart is heavy.  I cannot seem to get relief from the sadness.  It is not that I am willfully away from my times of prayer, Bible study, and ministry.  But, the sorrow that is in my soul is deep.  It is not the kind of sorrow that a “pat on the back” can help because it is not “my” life, family, or friends that are the cause.  No amount of exercise, getting away for a little while, or going to a happy place can fix it.

My heart is broken.  It has been for quite a while. I kept thinking it would be whole again very soon, but that has been longer ago than I care to consider this morning.  I don’t remember ever having this level of heaviness for this long without it improving.

Perhaps it is the result of so many evidences of godlessness that are now rampant in our state and country.  The love for evil is growing exponentially while the effectiveness of those that claim to know Christ is growing less impactful.  Sin abounds in every category.  The recent election in Oklahoma to provide legalized marijuana (medical) is not a good step.  The expansion of casinos, breweries, theft of equipment that provide a man’s livelihood, sexual deviancy, sexual crimes against children, the thunderous rancor that we have for each other over “everything” that we disagree is at a level beyond what I have ever known in my lifetime.

Unity is found in a common aspiration to pursue good.  It is prevalent when we make God’s Word and Will our mandate.  Harmony is not absence of varying ideas and thoughts.  Harmony is learning to work together with our various “parts” we have to play to provide that marvelous sound of vibrancy that is compelling.  Communities flourish where the decisions made create the outcome that will be the greater good for our families, children, work places, and schools.

The church was once the center of that.  Today, we have substituted “pray and fast” for “play and feast”.  Our hedonism drives our decision making as every person wants what they want provided by the government’s mandates.  I don’t hear great sorrow that we no longer want what God wants for us.  We have rejected the ONE that made us, gave the principles for purposeful and fulfilling living, and the God before Whom we will one day give an account.  I am sad for my culture!

It was almost 1:00 in the morning when the phone rang. Dr. Leo Winters, a highly acclaimed surgeon, was abruptly awakened from his night’s sleep. There had been an accident and his skilled hands were needed for immediate surgery. The quickest route to the hospital happened to be through a rather tough area of the city, but with time being a critical factor, it was worth the risk. At one of the stoplights his door was yanked open by a man with a gray hat and a dirty flannel shirt. “I got to have your car!” the man screamed, pulling the Doctor from his seat. Winters tried to explain the seriousness of the situation, but the man would not listen. When the doctor was finally able to walk a while then get a taxi to the hospital, over an hour had elapsed and it was too late, as the patient had passed away 30 minutes earlier. The nurse told him that the father of the victim had gone to the chapel wondering why the doctor never came. Dr. Winters walked hurriedly to the chapel to explain what had happened to him. When he entered he saw the father kneeling in the front row, he was wearing a gray hat and a dirty flannel shirt. Tragically, the father had pushed from his life the “one” person who could have saved his son. (Copied).