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Worth Your Salt?

In ancient Greece, salt was so valuable that the slave trade involved an exchange of salt for a slave and gave rise to the expression, “not worth his salt.” Some 4,700 years ago the Peng-Tzao-Kan-Mu was published in China. It is probably the earliest known treatise on pharmacology, with detailed discussions of the palliative and curative powers of more than 40 kinds of salts

Historically, whether food was hunted, gathered, or grown and harvested, food supply was rarely available year-round to all members of a society. Yet, effective, year-round, reliable food storage was vital, especially for non-nomadic agricultural societies. Today, to maintain reliable food supplies to our ever-expanding urban populations, we refrigerate, freeze-dry or can our food. Food preservation problems seem trivial to most consumers in the developed world, outside of the world’s war zones. But, prior to the 19th century, effective food storage often made the difference between life and death to large segments of the world’s human population.

The response of the Swedes and most northern Europeans was to preserve almost all their food, and they used salt to do so. Beef and pork were salted and dried as joints, hams, and sausages. Butter was salted. Typically, it took a pound of salt to preserve 10 pounds of butter (salt was sufficiently costly that housewives removed salt before they used stored butter). Fish, whether freshwater or from the sea, were salted and dried, and bread was salted and hung to dry

In many religions, salt is still included on the altar to represent purity, and it is mixed into holy waters for the same reason. Ancient Greek worshipers consecrated salt in their rituals, for example the Vestal Virgins sprinkled all sacrificial animals with salt and flour. Salt was a token of permanence to both Jews of the Old Testament and Christians of the New Testament. To the Jews it came to signify the eternal covenant between Jews and Israel. Jewish temple offerings still include salt on the Sabbath and orthodox Jews still dip their bread in salt as a remembrance of those sacrifices. Did you know that there are more than 30 references in the Bible to salt? (The information above was taken fromhttp://www.saltworkconsultants.com/tablet/salt-and-civilization.html)

Sodium is an extremely active element found naturally only in combined form; it always links itself to another element. Chlorine, on the other hand, is the poisonous gas that gives bleach its offensive odor. When sodium and chlorine are combined, the result is sodium chloride… common table salt; the substance we use to preserve meat and bring out its flavor.

Love and truth can be like sodium and chlorine. Love without truth is flighty, sometimes blind, willing to combine with various doctrines. On the other hand, truth by itself can be offensive, sometimes even poisonous. Spoken without love, it can turn people away from the gospel. When truth and love are combined in an individual or a church, however, then we have what Jesus called “the salt of the earth,” and we’re able to preserve and bring out the beauty of our faith.

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Does that give you new insight and meaning to Jesus’ words…” You are the salt of the earth”?