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“STAINED!”

When I was a young man, Southern preachers from that era and pastors of notoriety in the 20th century would sometimes wear white suits to the church where they were preaching.  In some churches, there was a white light in the ceiling that would shine down as it was pointed at the pulpit area. This added light was there to emphasize that this “servant” of God in white was truly God’s man coming with God’s Word that had God’s message for God’s people.  It was always a powerful picture for the congregants as they listened to the messenger of God bringing the Word of the Lord.

As I grew older, white slacks with dark colored sports coats were in vogue.  I must admit, I longed to be able to wear “what was the going thing” as a young man.  However, the trend of white pants was something that I never attempted by me nor has it ever been so. 

My proclivity is to find dirt, grease, mud, coffee spills, food fragments in chairs, and other debris or snares that can be discovered in any ordinary day.  Perhaps you are known to occasionally spill, sit in, or drop something on your clothing.  With me, it is a “Law of Nature” that is as constant as gravity.  I have (for the most part) chosen to only wear white shirts when it is a “must”.  The reason is that my cleaners has a special bottle of stain remover behind the counter with my name on it called “Garland’s Grease Remover”.  I have entered the ranks of being proficient and created a brand to seek to rectify problematic stain removal. 

Though that kind of stain is aggravating, there is a more serious stain.  The Hebrews writer challenged us: ….  let us throw off everything that hinders and the sin that so easily entangles. And let us run with perseverance the race marked out for us, fixing our eyes on Jesus. Heb.12:1-2.  People can adapt to various knee and shoulder pains, debilitating injuries, strokes, and the like. Sadly, the same is true with the practice of sin.  If we allow it to be in our lives long enough, we don’t treat it as a deadly affliction.  Rather, we seek to adapt to its presence and convince ourselves that it is “just the way we are”.  That is not God’s will for us. Rather, it is the moral and spiritual weakness of carelessly accepting what Christ paid for on the cross.

A young lady who was attempting to defend her attendance at questionable places of amusement told her friend that she thought a Christian could go anywhere. Her friend replied, “Certainly she can, but I am reminded of a little incident which happened last summer when I went with a party of friends to explore a coal mine. One of the young women appeared dressed in a dainty white gown. When her friends remonstrated with her, she appealed to the old miner who was to act as guide to the party. ’Can’t I wear a white dress down into the mine?’ she asked petulantly. ‘Yes, mum,’ returned the old man, ‘there is nothing to keep you from wearing a white frock down there, but there will be considerable to keep you from wearing one back.’”

There is nothing that prevents a Christian from bringing his good testimony anywhere he goes; but there is much to keep him from bringing it back from questionable places without being stained by sin.  (Copied).